Feb 202013
 

At an event on CFAA reform last night I heard Brewster Kahle say what to my ears sounded like, “Law that follows technology tends to be ok. Law that tries to lead it is not.”

His comment came after an earlier tweet I’d made:

I think we need a per se rule that any law governing technology that was enacted more than 10 years ago is inherently invalid.

In posting that tweet I was thinking about two horrible laws in particular, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA). The former attempts to forbid “hacking,” and the second ostensibly tried to update 1968’s Wiretap Act to cover information technology. In both instances the laws as drafted generally incorporated the attitude that technology as understood then would be the technology the world would have forever hence, a prediction that has obviously been false. But we are nonetheless left with laws like these on the books, laws that hobble further innovation by how they’ve enshrined in our legal code what is right and wrong when it comes to our computer code, as we understood it in 1986, regardless of whether, if considered afresh and applied to today’s technology, we would still think so.

To my tweet a friend did challenge me, however, “What about Section 230? (47 U.S.C. § 230).” This is a law from 1996, and he has a point. Section 230 is a piece of legislation that largely immunizes Internet service providers for liability in content posted on their systems by their users – and let’s face it: the very operational essence of the Internet is all about people posting content on other people’s systems. However, unlike the CFAA and ECPA, Section 230 has enabled technology to flourish, mostly by purposefully getting the law itself out of the way of the technology.

The above are just a few examples of some laws that have either served technology well – or served to hamper it. There are certainly more, and some laws might ultimately do a bit of both. But the general point is sound: law that is too specific is often too stifling. Innovation needs to be able to happen however it needs to, without undue hindrance caused by legislators who could not even begin to imagine what that innovation might look like so many years before. After all, if they could imagine it then, it would not be so innovative now.